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20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthodox and trawl orthodox and those who are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beliefs, and which people enjoy common rights. we have today a situation in israel which hundreds of thousands of israelis do not have a personal status in the country. >> rose: change in syria, israel and jordan when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >>> a polar bear cub is born with no sense of sight. we are a decisional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city this is dharl charlie rose. >> the arab spring reached syria nearly two years ago when residents of a small southern city protested the government's tover ture of students. today those protests erupted into one of the post deadly civil yars in syrian history. over 400,000 refugees have fled the war-torn country, opposition remains
. >> and this union between religion and the state that we know has, you know, for a long time, church and state combined to keep -- to make contraceptives obscene. how do you explain this religious determinism on the part of so many opponents of abortion? >> well, there's sort of two ways of looking at it. i mean, many people don't know that abortion became criminalized in the united states not as a result of really a religious movement, but as part of the effort of white male doctors to professionalize, to gain control over medicine from midwives and herbalists. and also in response to a very similar moment in history that we're in now. it was a point in which there was a great deal of immigration, where native white birth rates were falling, and there was the first beginning of the suffrage and feminist movement, arguing that women shouldn't have to, that women should have a say in whether they have intercourse with their husbands. and the people who were asking the legislature to criminalize abortion were arguing that that had to be done to keep women in their place, to ensure that native wh
civic religion. radical still in much of the world but seemingly ordinary people can govern themselves. if we can't all agree on that and celebrate that, at least once every four years then there's something wrong with our culture >> brown: we have music. we have poetry. we got everything. >> everything, everything, wonderful >> and inclusiveness. that was the theme from beginning to end. people who often had been left out. were included. >> brown: all right. richard north and smith, annette gordon reed and beverly gauge, thank you all three >> thank you. >> ifill: and for the other news of this day, we turn to hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: there was word today that three americans died in the hostage stand-off in algeria that finally ended over the weekend. a u.s. official told the associated press that seven other americans escaped. it started wednesday when islamist militants linked to al- qaeda attacked a natural gas complex near the libyan border. algerian special forces then launched a series of operations to retake the site. today the prime minister gave his first official d
of religion and birth and marriage, and it was thought by ben gurren that these people who were already small in number and fairly isolated would eventually play themselves out. the early secular zionists thought the ultra-orttext would kind of die out. they didn't. they have lots of babies and their families grow and grow, and, "therefore, their proportion is larger. they don't serve in the military. they get enormous subsidies so that their kids can just study and not entertain mainstream of society. and main stream israeli society-- not just secular society-- is tired of that. they're tired of footing the bill. they're tired of seeing their kids serve in the military and not their kids. and yair lapid exemplifies it. >> rose: dennis, weigh in now, having listened to both of them, and you've spent as much time as anybody i know representing the united states in the region. >> i agree with pretty much both what david and port said. let me just add a couple of point, one, picking up on the last theme of sharing the burden. you you know, there is a joke that has gone around israel for some tim
. but they are, they separate their politics from their religion. and you really see ton the streetsment i men in many neighborhoods, and certainly in tel aviv people dress just as they do in the states. but there are a lot of neighborhoods and especially up here in jerusalem you see the orthodox everywhere and men in their black hats and curls behind their ears and the women whose hair really is as covered as women in many muslim countries. and so there is a lot of resentment, especially among secular israelis about the special privileges that the orthodox and the settler movement get. everything from greater public spending, to the fact that the ultraorthodox with their young people say they are studying the torah are exempted from compulsory national military service that every other young israeli, male or female has to serve. and that is really you know, the most striking divide that i see here in israel. >> brown: so margaret, give us a flavor for what is coming next week. what are you reporting on. >> warner: jeff, we came here to look at the three big issues that newly elected president
in 2003 for the pbs program "religion and ethics newsweekly." >> ifill: finally tonight, we begin a series of conversations on how the digital world affects, and infects, the culture we live in. back with us is our daily download team, who spent last year examining how the political campaign played out online. newshour political editor christina bellantoni takes it from there. for that we are joined by two journalists from the website daily download. howard kurtz is "newsweek"'s washington bureau chief and host of cnn's reliable sources. lauren, howy, welcome back this year. as technology has evolved employers are being forced to rewrite their social media rules. what is it that we're seeing? >> we're seeing a series of rulings from the national labor relations board. what we're finding is that workers are allowed to complain online, on facebook, if they want to improve wages and working conditions. otherwise, for get about it. >> you might think you'd get in trouble for dissing the boss in some of these cases. i guess there was one case where several case workers in buffalo got fired for
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)